A Couple of Interviews and an Article

I have recently done a podcast and will be streaming an interview tomorrow. The podcast was done by Futurizer and can be heard on Trond Undheim’s website. https://trondundheim.com/podcast/ The direct link to the podcast is https://www.futurized.org/the-real-world-beyond-sustainability/ Tomorrow,, June 17th, I am streaming a conversation, sponsored by the International Humanistic Management Association. The live link is https://us02web.zoom.us/j/5102359757?pwd=MXhDdEJqVjVNWlE4S2JrcmxyTWVSdz09 I will post a link to the video after the event is over. This event is tied to the publication of an article in the periodical magazine, Amplify,  of Cutter, a member of the Arthur D Little Community. The article can be downloaded here.

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The Only Real Option To Save the Planet

“The world is running out of options to hit climate goals, U.N. report shows” Is this headline from the WaPo (April 4, 2022) correct? I do not believe so. This old “joke” may help understand why. A policeman goes to help a drunk searching for something under a streetlight and asks what he has lost. He says his keys and they both look under the streetlight together. After a few minutes, the policeman asks if he is sure he lost them here, and the drunk replies, “No, I lost them in the park.” The policeman asks why he is searching… Read More

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Why was “God” invented

Still batting zero in getting my opeds published. I thought this one was pretty timely. Even if the title seems nonsensical or blasphemous, it is a valid question. Whether or not “God” exists, some human being invented the word, “god,” or its equivalent in other languages. I can think of a few ways that this happened. One is as a neologism to explain something that was inexplicable, but important enough to require naming. I suspect this is how it happened because we know that early cultures showed signs of something we would call “god” or “gods.” Many natural phenomena would… Read More

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The Criticality of Critical Thinking

Tried to get this published also. Those who would ban critical thinking in any form are making a huge mistake. If they believe they are protecting the youth of America from some evil force, they are doing just the opposite. Freedom in the fullest sense means that one must be able to act authentically, to create and own one’s actions. Cognitively, it means escaping from stories, based on the past, that run most of our lives. Only then can one call what they are doing their own—the autonomy that underlies freedom. The idea of critical thinking arose when thinkers figured… Read More

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And then they came for me

Another rejected oped. I have been trying to get McGilchrist and the divided-brain-model into the press with no success so far. It seems a waste to simply file them away. More to come from the past and, I expect more in the future. What holds the United States together? This question has become very important in the face of the many rifts that have cropped up recently. The answer is not, as many might say, patriotism or nationalism or any other ideology. The glue lies in the many powers, rights, or duties that have been explicitly created through the ratification… Read More

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The Wisdom of Thich Nhat Hanh

My wife and I had a conversation a few days ago about wisdom. It’s not an easy question. How can you tell whether or when someone is wise? Is it something about them that hangs in there? My response was very pragmatic. Wisdom shows up after the fact in the assessment of whatever action, often involving some guidance to another, was taken. Did it fit the circumstances, beyond anything routine? Routines are the opposite of wise acts they always fit, by definition of the word routine. Wisdom only shows up when the going gets tough and our routines fail us.… Read More

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The Irony in “Of Two Minds”

A bit of synchronicity to report. Right after posting the last entry about the death of the Buddhist monk, Thich Nhat Hanh, my wife said I should look at the NYTimes Book Review section. The front page article on yesterday’s copy carried the title, “Of Two Minds.” It was a review of a new book, The Zen of Therapy, by Mark Epstein, a psychiatrist, contrasting two apparently opposing practices: psychotherapy and Buddhist meditation. I have not read the book, so what I write here is based on the second-hand report by the reviewer. Here is a key excerpt from the… Read More

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The Power of Mindfulness

The Buddhist sage, Thich Nhat Hanh, died this week. Arthur Brooks wrote a moving tribute to him in the Washington Post on January 23, 2022 focused on his contributions to bringing mindfulness to our largely sound asleep Western world. I have excerpted a number of paragraphs from Brooks’s article because they contain extroordinary clear connections to McGilchrist’s divided-brain-model. Mindfulness corresponds to moments when the right hemisphere is connecting us to the real world or, as Hanh writes, to the “present moment.” The opposite situation, where the left hemisphere is in command, is captured in the references to “exist[ing] outside the… Read More

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A Response to David Brooks

Here is yet another rejected oped piece, this one by the NYTimes. I wrote this in response to a David Brooks oped, headlined, “America Is Falling Apart at the Seams,” (click here to see it). He pointed to all the asocial events going on in the US, but could not identify any reason. That was the main thrust of his piece. My attempt to provide a good reason didn’t make it into the editorial pages. How can we, who think we have a solid clue to explain and repair our badly damaged social system, crack the wall that prevents the… Read More

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